Research

Listed below is a range of research relating to Osteopathy.  Studies vary in size and findings.  Ongoing larger scale research is required in many areas to support Osteopathic treatments.  Please use this information as a guide only and not as a guarantee to the benefits of Osteopathic treatment for your condition.  Please contact us should you have any questions regarding this.

Gert Bronfort, Mitch Haas, Roni Evans, Brent Leininger, Jay Triano

Published on PubMed

Spinal manipulation/mobilization is effective in adults for: acute, subacute, and chronic low back pain; migraine and cervicogenic headache; cervicogenic dizziness; manipulation/mobilization is effective for several extremity joint conditions; and thoracic manipulation/mobilization is effective for acute/subacute neck pain.

Following a review (by the UK government's independent Advertising Standards Authority  of the Bronfort et al Review in 2010) they accept that Osteopaths may claim to help a variety of medical conditions, including:

  • generalised aches and pains
  • joint pains including hip and knee pain from osteoarthritis as an adjunct to core OA treatments and exercise
  • arthritic pain
  • general, acute & chronic backache, back pain (not arising from injury or accident)
  • uncomplicated mechanical neck pain (as opposed to neck pain following injury i.e. whiplash)
  • headache arising from the neck (cervicogenic) / migraine prevention
  • frozen shoulder/ shoulder and elbow pain/ tennis elbow (lateral epicondylitis) arising from associated musculoskeletal conditions of the back and neck, but not isolated occurrences
  • circulatory problems
  • cramp
  • digestion problems
  • joint pains, lumbago
  • sciatica
  • muscle spasms
  • neuralgia
  • fibromyalgia
  • inability to relax
  • rheumatic pain
  • minor sports injuries and tensions.